Hans Bürki: A Story of Persecution and Perserverance

Nijmegen (Nimewegen), Holland in 1641 Hans Bürki: Langnau, Switzerland 1710 “For the remembrance of my descendants and of all my fellow believers, I, Hans Bürki, of Langnau, want to relate what happened to me. I had gone to the mountain called Bluttenried (Community of Langnau), in company with my wife and two sons. There a poor man came to us to whom we gave something to eat; this man subsequently went to Harvag to the authorities and told them that...

The Bergey Homestead

The Bergey Homestead still stands on land purchased in 1726 by Hans (John) Ulrich Bergey. The property is located on the banks of the northeast branch of Perkiomen Creek, in Salford Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Hans “john” ulrich bergey: first bergey immigrant Hans Ulrich Bergey was born in Canton Bern, Switzerland in April of 1700. He immigrated to Pennsylvania with a large Mennonite group around 1717 and married Mary (possibly Clemens.) After immigrating to America Hans changed to the anglicized...

Samuel Rider: American Pilgrim

Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall Nineteen years after the Mayflower’s 1620 arrival in America, Samuel Rider, and his family sailed from England to join the Pilgrims in the Plymouth Colony. By the time Samuel arrived in New England, Plymouth’s population was nearing 600 families. Over the next few decades, Rider would become a prominent name throughout the colony, with several of Samuel’s children and grandchildren marrying the descendants of Mayflower passengers. The early years of samuel rider Samuel Rider...

Johan Peter Steigerwald (Stierwalt): German Craftsman

  Coming to America Johan Peter Steigerwald, known as Peter, was born in 1730 in the Hesse region of Germany and grew up in Floersbach, about 35 miles east of Frankfurt. In 1749 Peter is named on a Hesse Lutheran Parish registry with his father, Johannes (John), as one of the emigrants who left for Pennsylvania. Much like the Swiss Anabaptist movement, the early 1700’s saw large numbers of German Lutherans moving to the English Colonies in search of religious freedom. Johannes...

School Days: The Ove Sisters

The How do-you-do-bunch Today I stumbled across the Pennington County Historical Society Website and was excited to find some great photos of the Ove sisters while attending high school in Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Ida (Ove) Conlin (front row, center) and her sister Nettie Ove (middle row, right) are both part of the “How do-you-do-Bunch”. You may also recognize Nell (Nellie Berg) from my previous Nettie Ove: Milliners Daughter post. I have no idea what the “How do-you-do-Bunch” did, but it sounds...

Nettie Ove: Milliner’s Daughter

Photo of Olga Hulltin, Nellie (Berg) Pellymounter, Nettie Ove and Florence “Flora” (Berg) Glanville of Thief River Falls, Minnesota (taken abt. 1912). millinery and the ove family Beginning in the 1500’s, Italian merchants from Milan, known as “Millaners”, would travel throughout northern Europe selling fine women’s fashions and ornaments. Eventually, the term, milliner, came to be used for the artisans who created women’s bonnets and hats. During the 19th and early 20th century, hats were a staple of every fashionable woman’s...

A May Day Tradition: New York Moving Day

“Never knew the city in such a chaotic state. Every other house seems to be disgorging itself into the street; all the sidewalks are lumbered with bureaus and bedsteads to the utter destruction of their character as thoroughfares, and all the space between the sidewalks is occupied by long processions of carts and wagons and vehicles omnigenous laden with perilous piles of moveables.” -The Diary of Templeton Strong (Cover Photo: May Day in New York, Harper’s Magazine, 1850) Moving Day…packing...

Finding Jacob Ove: Researching Norwegian Ancestors

Jacob Ove (left) with an unidentified person (right) My memories of visiting Great-grandma and Grandpa Conlin while growing up are primarily connected to sweets — namely butterscotch candies and fig newtons. Grandma needed those candies to keep Grandpa sweet…or so she said. When I grew older and began genealogy research there were plenty of stories and information passed down about Grandpa Conlin’s Irish Family and Grandma Conlin’s mother’s Norwegian family, but when it came to her father, I only knew two things:...